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Gadhwal Saree

Gadwal sarees are made in Andhra Pradesh and are famous for their fascinating cotton field with heavy silk border and pallu. There is complicated joinery involved and this gives the silk/cotton mix sari its charm and is a mark of hand-woven authenticity. Gadwal Saris were traditionally woven in the interlocked-weft technique (called Kupadam or tippadamu here), often with kumbam (also called kotakomma) in the borders, and were known as a kupadam or kumbam sari. The silk border was either tussar or mulberry, and the body was often of unbleached cotton, although it may have also contained colored cotton or silk checks. A pure silk version of gadhwal saree also existed, usually woven in bright contrasting colors. Most Gadhwal Saris are woven with interlocked - weft borders of contrasting colors. It is believed that the brocading abilities of many of the weavers in Gadwal originate from Banaras, where a local Maharaja sent their ancestors to learn brocade weaving skills. The designs, however, do not show any Banaras influences but are strongly south-east Indian in structure and aesthetic quality. They are often regarded as 'Puja ' Sarees by local women who wear them for religious and festive occasions. Gadhwal Sarees were traditionally woven in the interlocked-weft technique (called Kupadam or tippadamu here), often with kumbam (also called kotakomma) in the borders, and were known as a kupadam or kumbam sari. The silk border was either tussar or mulberry, and the body was often of unbleached cotton, although it may have also contained colored cotton or silk checks. A pure silk version of this sari also existed, usually woven in bright contrasting colors such as canary yellow or lime green. Most Gadwal Sarees are woven with interlocked - weft borders of contrasting colors. It is believed that the brocading abilities of many of the weavers in Gadwal originate from Banaras, where a local Maharaja sent their ancestors to learn brocade weaving skills. The designs, however, do not show any Banaras influences but are strongly south-east Indian in structure and aesthetic quality. They are often regarded as 'Puja ' Sarees by local women who wear them for religious and festive occasions. Traditionally, Gadwal Sarees are woven in the interlocked-weft technique and with borders of contrasting colors. This method is known as ‘kupadam’ or ‘tippadamu’ in Telugu. The

silk borders of Gadwal Sarees are either tussar or mulberry and the body is often of unbleached cotton and many times colored cotton or silk checks. The silk version of the Gadwal Sari usually is woven in bright contrasting colors like canary yellow or lime green. The designs have a strong Southeast Indian influence in structure and aesthetic quality. The weavers source silk from Bangalore and pure zari from Surat. Gadwal Sarees show strong design links to the silk border - Cotton body Sarees of the eastern Central Deccan. Gadwal Sarees were traditionally woven in the interlocked-weft technique (called Kupadam or tippadamu here), often with kumbam (also called kotakomma) in the borders, and were known as a kupadam or kumbam sari. The silk border was either tussar or mulberry, and the body was often of unbleached cotton, although it may have also contained colored cotton or silk checks. A pure silk version of this sari also existed, usually woven in bright contrasting colors such as canary yellow or lime green. Most Gadwal Sarees are woven with interlocked - weft borders of contrasting colors. It is believed that the brocading abilities of many of the weavers in Gadwal originate from Banaras, where a local Maharaja sent their ancestors to learn brocade weaving skills. The designs, however, do not show any Banaras influences but are strongly south-east Indian in structure and aesthetic quality. They are often regarded as 'Puja ' Sarees by local women who wear them for religious and festive occasions. • Gadwal saree is made in cotton in a style influenced by the Benarasi weaves. While the ground of the saree is cotton, there is a loosely attached silk border. • Copper or gold-dipped zari is generally used in these sarees. The motifs of the murrugan (peacock) and the rudraksh are popular. • Traditional colors for these sarees are earth shades of browns, grays and off-whites. However, brighter shades have been introduced for the North Indian buyer.

Traditional Saree